Tuesday, September 05, 2006

This is when I think about the 1935 Cubs

Photo of Gabby Hartnett on opening day, 1930 from dcabear720

Anyone remember the 1935 Cubs? I didn't think so. Long before the Cubs became a national punchline, they actually went the World Series somewhat regularly. Between 1929 and 1938, they went every three years; then they went in 1945 for the final time.

Anyhow, the 1935 Cubs have always held some fascination for me, mainly because they wound up the season by winning 21 straight games. That's the second-longest win streak of all time, trailing only the 1916 Giants with 26. The 2002 A's had 20; the 1906 White Sox and the 1947 Yankees had 19.

The Cubs lost the second game of a double header on Sept. 2, 1935, to the Reds and were 2 and half games back of the Gas House Gang Cardinals at that point. They then won 20 straight games, clinch the NL pennant in the first game of a doubleheader with the Cardinals, 6–2, beating Dizzy Dean, won the nightcap, then lost the last two games of the season and lost the World Series to the Tigers. Only once during the winning streak did the Cubs pitchers given up more than three runs. Cubs owner Phil Wrigley was the first to broadcast all of his team’s games on the radio. And it was the last Cubs team to win 100 games in a season.

Glancing at the roster, it looks like Gabby Hartnett, Augie Galan and Billy Herman were the top offensive players though the lineup looks fairly solid all the way around -- Stan Hack, Billy Jurges, Chuck Klein, Phil Cavaretta, Frank Demaree. Klein, Hartnett and Herman are in the Hall of Fame as are reserves Kiki Cuyler and Freddie Lindstrom. The starting pitching was quite good with Lon Warneke and Bill Lee both winning 20 and Larry French winning 17.

Do the 2006 Giants have it in them to win 21 in a row? Probably not, especially after tonight's embarrassing 3-hit shuout by Bronson Arroyo -- his first ever. What is it about this team that makes them paralyzed against guys who have been undistinguished during the rest of their careers? They also got shut out this year by the immortal Ian Snell and Kip Wells, both of the Pirates.

But you never know, especially now that Bonds is hot and Blownitez isn't being allowed to lose games.

3 Comments:

Anonymous Dan said...

When I think of the Cubs and all the years of losing baseball they have played since the pennant year of 1945, one thing strikes me as significant:

Their fans tolerate losing. Cub fans sell out Wrigley on a regular basis no matter how inferior the product on the field is.

I don't see any other fan base that has been willing to accept sixty years of crappy baseball (well, maybe except for fans of the Hated Blue, who are the least knowledgeable fans in the game).

12:57 PM  
Anonymous Dan said...

When I think of the Cubs and all the years of losing baseball they have played since the pennant year of 1945, one thing strikes me as significant:

Their fans tolerate losing. Cub fans sell out Wrigley on a regular basis no matter how inferior the product on the field is.

I don't see any other fan base that has been willing to accept sixty years of crappy baseball (well, maybe except for fans of the Hated Blue, who are the least knowledgeable fans in the game).

12:57 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Really the 1916 Giants streak should be listed as a non-losing streak since it included ties.

The Cubs 1935 streak was all wins.

As for Dan's comment. He could not be more wrong. The Cubs do not regularly sell out Wrigley. In fact there was a time when they closed the upper deck because they regularly did not have enough fans attending to warrant using it.

1:29 AM  

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